Change

Online Visual Diary of Albie J Colvin

Sweet Sunday Beats

Smashing through my creative block with the help of some new beats by Mattie Rae

Cartoon infographics 
As the age old saying goes ‘a picture says a thousand words’, what’s more pictures often need no translation. 
International programs/organisations have culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) stakeholders. Therefore pages of text is often not the most appropriate method when trying to community key messages.
This cartoon infographic is one I prepared to explain the key objectives of internaiotnal youth arts initiative ‘Colour Them Safe’ (as described below), as the primary stakeholders are from different points of the globe and all speak different languages. 
Step 1. Utilise arts to engage young people that are disadvantaged in a process of enrichment and skills development.
Step 2. Source supplied and creative resources for projects.
Step 3. Link artists to nurture the creative potential of disadvantaged young people.
Step 4. Build community connections of support for disadvantaged young people.
Step 5. Encourage healthy learning interaction across a multitude of platforms between participants, artists and the full community.
Step 6. Raise awareness about the issues faced by disadvantaged young people.

Cartoon infographics 

As the age old saying goes ‘a picture says a thousand words’, what’s more pictures often need no translation. 

International programs/organisations have culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) stakeholders. Therefore pages of text is often not the most appropriate method when trying to community key messages.

This cartoon infographic is one I prepared to explain the key objectives of internaiotnal youth arts initiative ‘Colour Them Safe’ (as described below), as the primary stakeholders are from different points of the globe and all speak different languages. 

Step 1. Utilise arts to engage young people that are disadvantaged in a process of enrichment and skills development.

Step 2. Source supplied and creative resources for projects.

Step 3. Link artists to nurture the creative potential of disadvantaged young people.

Step 4. Build community connections of support for disadvantaged young people.

Step 5. Encourage healthy learning interaction across a multitude of platforms between participants, artists and the full community.

Step 6. Raise awareness about the issues faced by disadvantaged young people.

Whãnau RangatiratangaConfident, vibrant and healthy whãnau working towards safe & nourishing communities for their young people.
Tapu - Under protection/sacred represented by the waters of the great lake (moana) as an acknowledgment of the need for respect in order bring whãnau together.
Mana / Mana Tangata - Pride, confidence and authority over ones choices/destiny represented by the waka head (tau ihu) the face of the community leading the way.
Ãroha - Love, affection, charity, sympathy, compassion and empathy represented by the sun (rã) a representaiton for mother nature’s nurture and care.
Pono - The integrity between what is and what should be/truth represented by the waka hull (hiwi) as a representation of trust being the foundation to vibrant and healthy relationships.
Tika - What is right and worthy of respect/tapu represented by the wind (tã) as a symbol of nature
Ahurea - Culture (embodying tradition, history, ancestory, social fibre) represented by the waka stern post (taurapa) as it provides stability and backing to whãnau. 
Anamata - Hereafter, ‘face the future’ represented by the paddels (hoe) - being Care (Manaaki), Knowledge/wisdom (Mõhio), Health (Hauora), Finacial security (Punga), Spirit (Wairua) - these embody hope and prosperity for whãnau.
*Adapted from twona.org.nz

Whãnau Rangatiratanga
Confident, vibrant and healthy whãnau working towards safe & nourishing communities for their young people.

Tapu - Under protection/sacred represented by the waters of the great lake (moana) as an acknowledgment of the need for respect in order bring whãnau together.

Mana / Mana Tangata - Pride, confidence and authority over ones choices/destiny represented by the waka head (tau ihu) the face of the community leading the way.

Ãroha - Love, affection, charity, sympathy, compassion and empathy represented by the sun (rã) a representaiton for mother nature’s nurture and care.

Pono - The integrity between what is and what should be/truth represented by the waka hull (hiwi) as a representation of trust being the foundation to vibrant and healthy relationships.

Tika - What is right and worthy of respect/tapu represented by the wind (tã) as a symbol of nature

Ahurea - Culture (embodying tradition, history, ancestory, social fibre) represented by the waka stern post (taurapa) as it provides stability and backing to whãnau. 

Anamata - Hereafter, ‘face the future’ represented by the paddels (hoe) - being Care (Manaaki), Knowledge/wisdom (Mõhio), Health (Hauora), Finacial security (Punga), Spirit (Wairua) - these embody hope and prosperity for whãnau.

*Adapted from twona.org.nz

Some thoughts about being a designer the role design can play in the health and wellbeing arena.

As Ezio Manzini, (2008) comments: 
'Being a designer means being an optimist: given the problems, all the problems even the most difficult, all we can do is to presume there is a possibility of solving them, not because we cannot see the difficulties (designers must also be realists), but because we have no alternative…One purpose of Design research is to produce knowledge useful to those who design: design knowledge that designer and non-designer (individuals, communities, institutions, companies) can use in their processes of designing and co-designing'.
(Ezio Manzini, 10.7.08, New design knowledge Introduction to the Conference Changing the Change)

KiaKaha Anamata
Illustration inspired through my work with the young people from Cafe for Youth Health in Taupo NZ. An image of a strong, healthy and confident warrior. Backed by history, ancestry and the spirit of the land (symbolised by the feather w/ 3 mountains - Mt Tongariro, Mt Ngauruhoe and Mt Ruapehu etc.) and guided in prosperity by a Colensoa Physaloide (a koru plant representing the future and growth).

KiaKaha Anamata

Illustration inspired through my work with the young people from Cafe for Youth Health in Taupo NZ. An image of a strong, healthy and confident warrior. Backed by history, ancestry and the spirit of the land (symbolised by the feather w/ 3 mountains - Mt Tongariro, Mt Ngauruhoe and Mt Ruapehu etc.) and guided in prosperity by a Colensoa Physaloide (a koru plant representing the future and growth).

Sketching Te Wheke, Maori Model of Health.
The concept of Te Wheke, the octopus, is to define family health. The head of the octopus represents te whānau, the eyes of the octopus as waiora (total wellbeing for the individual and family) and each of the eight tentacles representing a specific dimension of health. The dimensions are interwoven and this represents the close relationship of the tentacles.
Te whānau – the familyWaiora – total wellbeing for the individual and familyWairuatanga – spiritualityHinengaro – the mindTaha tinana – physical wellbeingWhanaungatanga - extended familyMauri – life force in people and objectsMana ake – unique identity of individuals and familyHā a koro ma, a kui ma – breath of life from forbearersWhatumanawa – the open and healthy expression of emotion

Sketching Te Wheke, Maori Model of Health.

The concept of Te Wheke, the octopus, is to define family health. The head of the octopus represents te whānau, the eyes of the octopus as waiora (total wellbeing for the individual and family) and each of the eight tentacles representing a specific dimension of health. The dimensions are interwoven and this represents the close relationship of the tentacles.

Te whānau – the family
Waiora – total wellbeing for the individual and family
Wairuatanga – spirituality
Hinengaro – the mind
Taha tinana – physical wellbeing
Whanaungatanga - extended family
Mauri – life force in people and objects
Mana ake – unique identity of individuals and family
Hā a koro ma, a kui ma – breath of life from forbearers
Whatumanawa – the open and healthy expression of emotion

Set the world on fire…

Set the world on fire…

Conversations, Confessions & Convictions - Albie Colvin Solo Exhibition.(Donkey Wheel Basement, 673 Bourke Street Melbourne CBD)
The show will feature over 20 mixed media paintings from the last decade of my time in Melbourne. Delving into the mind and instinctively using art to better understand the complexities of identity and the challenges around the social landscapes in which I live. Each piece is an active discussion on topics that have been developmentally significant to me. Culture, community, diversity, inclusion and mental health are amongst the topics featured in this body of work.  
I’m an NZ artist currently based in Melbourne who has worked creatively both locally and internationally. My recent work includes social change collaboration with City of Port Phillip (COPP) and Resourcing Health & Education for Sex Workers (RhED), aimed at developing an artistic approach to improving the quality of life for some of St Kilda’s most marginalized individuals. Further the proceeds of this exhibition will contribute to my latest project, international youth arts initiative ‘Colour Them Safe’. Aiming to creating a better world for disadvantaged young people through a process of enrichment and skills development that seeks to build connections to support and community.
An opening reception for the exhibition will take place from 6pm on Thursday September 19th, and viewing which will run through September 23rd Midday until 6pm daily.

Conversations, Confessions & Convictions - Albie Colvin Solo Exhibition.
(Donkey Wheel Basement, 673 Bourke Street Melbourne CBD)

The show will feature over 20 mixed media paintings from the last decade of my time in Melbourne. Delving into the mind and instinctively using art to better understand the complexities of identity and the challenges around the social landscapes in which I live. Each piece is an active discussion on topics that have been developmentally significant to me. Culture, community, diversity, inclusion and mental health are amongst the topics featured in this body of work.  

I’m an NZ artist currently based in Melbourne who has worked creatively both locally and internationally. My recent work includes social change collaboration with City of Port Phillip (COPP) and Resourcing Health & Education for Sex Workers (RhED), aimed at developing an artistic approach to improving the quality of life for some of St Kilda’s most marginalized individuals. Further the proceeds of this exhibition will contribute to my latest project, international youth arts initiative ‘Colour Them Safe’. Aiming to creating a better world for disadvantaged young people through a process of enrichment and skills development that seeks to build connections to support and community.

An opening reception for the exhibition will take place from 6pm on Thursday September 19th, and viewing which will run through September 23rd Midday until 6pm daily.

Not need to fret, just be free

Not need to fret, just be free